E-Sports Video Streaming coming of Age

03 Jun eSports: Coming of Age with Video Streaming

Sometimes on a lazy afternoon, there’s nothing quite like going out and having a friendly pick-up game of basketball or football. But when the weather is crummy and you and your friends are bored, perhaps you reach for your favorite console and play some video games. Play them enough, get good, and perhaps you can enter an eSports competition.

Back in February, we introduced our readers to eSports as a rapidly growing segment of the online video market. Today, in installment one of our series on eSports, we want to further detail the industry and mention how you can get into the ground floor of this Millennial phenomenon. With an incredibly high growth rate, surpassing that of even traditional physical sports, and competitions broadcast primarily via livestreaming services, the eSports phenomenon is an interesting one with significant potential, especially if you get in early.

But just what are eSports? In simple terms, eSporting is competitive video gaming. But don’t dismiss it as a niche market, or a “cult interest” because eSports are much more than that, they’re a platform builder. In fact, Amazon’s livestreaming platform Twitch is often credited as helping eSports develop as a genre, but recent evidence reveals it isn’t so one sided – eSports has helped Twitch grow too.

In April 2016, a report by gamesindustry.biz reported how 21.3% of Twitch’s total content viewing hours were spent viewing eSports related videos between July and December 2015. The biggest names included Dota 2 and StarCraft II, as well as League of Legends and Counter Strike: Global Offensive.

But Twitch’s dominance didn’t go unchallenged for very long. Activision Blizzard recently announced that Facebook will carry the livestream for Black Ops III, a recent installment to their Call of Duty franchise. The social media giant will also carry MLG (Major League Gaming) .tv’s live broadcast. Said Facebook’s Dan Read, Head of Global Sports Partnerships, “With over 1.6 billion people on the platform and a growing suite of VOD and live streaming products that partners can use to increase engagement, Facebook is uniquely positioned to help eSports fans connect around exciting moments and great eSports content.”

Indeed, Facebook seems to have an advantage in this “arena”. The transparency offered via public profiles, as well as advanced filters, and more mainstream use, Facebook is well suited to inhibit pesky trolls from ruining the spectating experience, and share content with a wider audience than the one Twitch already serves.

As eSports Observer elaborates on further, it’s part of a growing trend of large companies trying to nab the streaming rights for the burgeoning industry…and they are willing to pay a lot of money to do so.

To maximize their investment, and assert dominance in the youthful eSports livestreaming industry, companies need to turn to services like YOUBORA to ensure their audience is provided with the best Quality of Experience (QoE) possible. The real time metrics YOUBORA offers lead the industry in providing real time, actionable insights to ensure your content gains an advantage over your competition via a satisfied audience – and a happy customer translates to increased revenue, sounds good doesn’t it?

 

Just another thing to think about from us here at NPAW.

 

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